Riot almost ensues at a Dunkin Donuts over a donut

Can sugar be as addicting as cocaine?  Because from what I can see, high levels of sugar can act like cocaine1274451864store_details_dunkin

The other day I was in Dunkin Donuts getting a medium coffee, I brought my own packet of raw stevia by the way.  What I witnessed was very scary to me.

I watched a riot almost ensue right in front of me over a donut.

There was a long line of people that day getting their usually coffee’s and fast food breakfast.

The guy in front of me, who was a bit overweight, ordered two large coolatta’s, which contains 114gms of sugar each.  That’s accurate because I checked the Dunkin Donuts website.

Talk about a sugar blast!

Next the women working behind the counter said, “You get a free donut with your order, what would you like?”

Immediately the man snapped back at her saying, “I get two free donuts because I ordered two drinks!”

The Dunkin Donuts attendant disagreed and said you only get one donut per order.

This guy had a look on his face like that extra donut would mean life or death.  He continued to snap back and argued that he should get his free donut with each drink.

Now the other Dunkin Donuts disciples on line started to become restless.  People started shouting back and forth.  I thought a riot would ensue over a donut.

All I could think to myself was, are they giving out donuts or cocaine?

Or maybe, what’s the difference.

Several important studies have actually confirmed the relationship between sugar consumption and behavioral changes.

 

Dr. Stephen Schoenthaler conducted diet research on children for almost 30 years.  His original seminal studies eliminated sugar and junk foods from the lunch programs of one million school children in over eight hundred New York schools during a seven-year period (1976-1983).   There was a 15.7% gain (from 39.2% to 55%) in learning ability compared with other schools during the years in which these changes in diet were introduced.

Schoenthaler also noted that out of 124,000 children who had once been unable to learn grammar and mathematics, 75,000 were able to perform these basic tasks after dietary changes alone.  In other words, removing sugary foods made children smarter!

As I mention in my book The Brain Detox Diet, sugar and carbohydrates will give you an initial spike in dopamine and serotonin, which is why some people turn to those types of feel good foods. The good feeling is short lived and those feel good chemicals in your brain dip fast. Another adverse side effect is that the more you do this, the weaker the reaction of the chemical becomes, so you begin to eat more junk food to find that good feeling again. This is how addictions are formed, which is why sugar addiction has similar characteristics as cocaine addiction.  
One of the neurotransmitters playing a major role in addiction is dopamine. Many of the concepts that apply to dopamine apply to other neurotransmitters as well. As a chemical messenger, dopamine is similar to adrenaline. Dopamine affects brain processes that control movement, emotional response, and ability to experience pleasure and pain. It also acts as our reward sensation chemical, so you can see how certain food addictions could develop because of low levels of dopamine.

 

You can read more about overcoming stresses in your life so that you don’t have to turn to food in The Brain Detox Diet.

 

 

Schoenthaler, S., et al. The Impact of Low Food Additive and Sucrose Diet on Academic Performance in 803 New York City Public Schools. l986, Int J Biosocial Res 8:2.

Schoenthaler, S., Detention Home Double-Blind Study: Sugar Goes on Trial. Int J Biosocial Res l982 3(1):1-9.  Schoenthaler, S., Northern California Diet-Behavior Program: An Empirical Examination of 3,000 Incarcerated Juveniles in Stanislaus County Juvenile Hall. l983, Int J Biosocial Res 5(2):99-108.

[38] Schoenthaler, S., Detention Home Double Blind Study: Sugar Goes on Trial. Int J Biosocial Res l982 3(1):1-9.  Schoenthaler, S., Northern California Diet-Behavior Program: An Empirical Examination of 3,000 Incarcerated Juveniles in Stanislaus County Juvenile Hall. l983, Int J Biosocial Res 5(2):99-108